Perspectives on Pele

perspectivesonpele

Perspectives on Pele
Tuesday, July 14, 2015
8:30 am – 1:30 pm
University of Hawai‘i at Hilo
Hale ‘Ōlelo, Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani
College of Hawaiian Language, Room 112

Kīlauea—revered by some, and the source of fascination and geological research for others.  Since the time of ancient Hawaiians to the modern and contemporary era, this volcano continues to capture our imagination and inspire us to think about this powerful and natural wonder, as well as our connections to the ‘āina.

The moʻolelo and histories about Kīlauea embrace several viewpoints: Native Hawaiian; and more recently since the early 1800s, explorers, scientists, and tourists.  These various attitudes were explored and discussed in a free and open-to-the-public Roundtable Discussion with Keola Awong, cultural anthropologist, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, U.S. National Park ServiceKen Hon, geologist, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo; Manaiakalani Kalua, kumu hula, Hawai‘i Community College; Jim Kauahikaua, geophysicist, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory; and Philip Wilson, historian, East Tennessee State University.

Following was a free workshop for community educators, K-12 teachers, public program educators, and learning center and park interpreters. Students were welcome as well. This active-learning workshop offered insights by experts on project-based learning & C3 framework, environmental history in Hawai‘i, and working with primary source materials (Hawaiian and English language sources). The featured experts at this workshop included the following: Kaliko Beamer-Trapp, lecturer, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo; Michael Bitter, historian, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo; Paul Field, historian (retired), Windward Community College; Ken Hon, geologist, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo; Kerri Inglis, historian, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo; Aolani Kailihou, lecturer, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo; Jim Kauahikaua, geophysicist, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory; Philip Wilson, historian, East Tennessee State University; and Helen Wong Smith, archivist, Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo.

After Dark in the Park: How Do We View Kīlauea?
Tuesday, July 14, 2015
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park
Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s After Dark in the Park presented a deliberative discussion with kumu hula Manaiakalani Kalua and historian Philip Wilson, on Kīlauea’s place in Hawaiian culture and the history of science, and where the two perspectives intersect and encounter one another.

Manaiakalani Kalua is a kumu hula, and a faculty member of the I Ola Haloa, Center for Hawai‘i Life Styles, Hawai‘i Community College. Philip Wilson is professor of history at East Tennessee State University, and has been a visiting professor at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. One of his interests is in Hawaiian history, comparing the significance of the volcano Kīlauea during the nineteenth century from the perspectives of naturalists, missionaries, and native Hawaiians.

Click here for the official National Park Service’s After Dark in the Park: How Do We View Kīlauea? program flyer.

Click to watch a video of the program After Dark in the Park: How Do We View Kīlauea.

This program was co-sponsored by Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities and University of Hawai‘i at Hilo,
and funded in part by the Sidney Stern Memorial Trust.